The lower square stone plinth of this tomb is 33 feet and 6 inches; the upper one is 24 feet; and the tomb building is 18 feet square. It is constructed of yellow sand stone, and is decorated with architectural details of same patterns as we see in other tombs at Chitori. The dome has collapsed, and the tow graves built on stone platform bear no epigraphical record to throw any light on the royal personages who are buried in them

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This is the eastern most tomb of the northern group of Talpur tombs at Chitori. It is a square building measuring16 feet and 3 inches,  and is surmounted by a brick dome on octagonal drum. The walls are plastered with lime, and contain square and rectangular panels. The grave is of bricks, and there is no inscription.

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Mir Rajo was son of Mir Allah Yar Khan Talpur. His tomb built on a stone plinth, is situated at the south west end of royal graveyard. Its outer plinth is 31 feet square; the second terrace above that is 24 feet square; and the body of tomb chamber is 17 feet square. The edifice is constructed of yellow sand stone with chiroli lime mortar. The stone carving and details of designs are on the patterns of Makli Hill monuments but the execution of work is some what inferior.
The dome has fallen, and the plinths are in poor state of preservation. The tomb chamber contains two sarcophagi of yellow stone, built on a raises platform. At the head of western grave, highup in the northern wall, there is a broken stone slab containing a Persian inscription. It records the name of the principal occupant, Mir Rajo son of Mir Allah Yar Khan Talpur, and the Hijra year 1209 (1794 A.D) when he died.

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Mir Musa Khan was son of Mir Alllah Yar Khan Talpur. The lower plinth of this square tomb measures 34 feet; the upper platform is 24 feet; and building proper is 18 feet square. It is on the east of Mir Rajo’s tomb, and is constructed in the same style. The lime plastered dome is intact, but cracks have appeared all over its surface. Its inner casing, which is of well dressed small yellow sand stone slabs, is well preserved. Outside a stone Kangura, partially intact, runs on all the sides and in each corner of the roof, is a small stone turret. Traces of stone bracket are visible below the kangura. A yellow stone pinnacle adorns the top of dome.
Inside, on a raised stone platform surrounded by carved railing, rests the grave of Mir Musa. The pillar of northern wall contains a stone inscription in Persian characters recording the Hijra year 1166 (1753 A.D) when Mir Musa died, and the cost of construction of his tomb which is rupees five thousand.
The building is square in plan, but inside corner lintels over the capitals make the plan octagonal, and support the dome. The floor is of stone slabs

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It is a small tomb which does not bear any inscription. It is originally built in burnt bricks, bearing lime plaster at the interior.
The tomb is lying in a dilapidated condition

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THE TOMB OF Mir Jado son of Mir Allah Yar Khan Talpur, is on the east of tomb Mir Masu’s. externally, it measures 12 feet on all sides, and its inner dimensions are 7’-6’’ by 7’-9’’. It is a small elegant edifice with umbrella shaped dome which is in good condition, except its lime plastered surface which has cracked.
The sarcophagus, resting on a stone platform and enclosed by pierced railing, is canopied by a vaulted roof of stone and lime plaster. It is decorated with simple geometric patterns and is inscribed with Kalimah at the head.
The roof is built on 8 carved pillars. On the outer surface of northern central pillar, there is a Persian inscription recording Mir Jado’s name and the Hijra year 1173 (1750 A.D) when died.

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This is a square tomb of brick and lime masonry measuring 22 feet and 6 inches with globular dome and octagonal drum. The drum has arched openings which were originally adorned with blue enamelled lattice work. The exterior of the building is plastered with lime and in order to break the monotony of plain surface of walls, tow rows of scalloped panels one above the other were provided on three sides. The eastern façade still preserves traces of white, blue, green and brown tiles.
Inside the tomb chamber, on a low platform of brick masonry, there rest three graves covered with tiles. The western grave bears a Persian inscription on a tile slab, and records the name of one Arzo Khokar, who fell fighting in 1190 A.H. the inscription of the central grace is mission. The eastern sarcophagus contains inscription in Persian characters recording the name of Faqir Khokar, who also died in battle in 1190 A.H (1776 A.D. the lineal identity of occupants of this tomb has not yet been established but it is probable that they were holding high positions under the Mirs Talpurs, and in recognition of their services, they were given burial place in the royal cemetery at Chitory

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Area : 23.12 Acres

About half a mile to the north of Mirpurkhas is a great heap of ruins known as Kahujodaro. Upto the time of the construction of the railway the ruins were though to be valueless, and the dug up bricks were utilized ror making concrete. During the excavations some ornamental bricks and two remarkable figures were pronounced as Sikhi, the second Buddha, and to belong to the first hall of the sixth century A>D. any how the description given by Me. H. Cousens, about the remains is narrated below:-
“the mound cover roughly about ten acres. Towards the north end of the site is the ruined stups in sundried bricks of an old stupa, which must be having a decorated outer casing of beautifully carved brick work much of which still remains. Forming a circle surrounding the stupa are large mound which appear to be the sites of monastic establishments. The stump of the stupa is a great solid mass of sundried brick laid in mud lying upon the ground ws found fragemtn froming nearly half of a degoba Tea of bunt caly in one piece with a large hole in the centre for the staff of the umbrella”.
The whole remains seem to be the site of a large Buddhist monastic establishment.

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Area : 1.5 Acres

A large long mound of sand measuring 2,500 by 1,500 feet, which rises about 25 feet above the surrounding level is situated about 12 miles south-west of Khairpur town and 6 miles north of Kot Diji. Its surface is littered with potsherds and other minor objects of typical Harappan Culture. It was presumed that the mound represented on of the large settlements set out to ascertain its character by limited excavation.
A number of trenches were laid in the south-eastern part of the mound where a thick accumulation of pottery on the surface suggested a sufficiently long occupation. At places digging down to a depth of 20 feet produced nothing under the pottery-strewn surface but an accumulation of clean sand. There was no evidence of any structure, the inhabitants seemed to have lived in that teched huts. The investigation showed that the mound represented a temporary occupation of the Harappan people who appear to have taken refuge on this high mound from a neighbouring settlement due to some calamity probably floods.
As a result of excavations, the pottery collected was characteristically Harappan in character including large storage jars, fine and delicate tiny vases, cups saucers.

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The most outstanding monument built at Sukkar during the Mughal period is the high minaret of Mir Masum. In excellence it may be compared with those at Dehli, Ahmadabad and Daulatabad. The construction of the minaret was started in 1595 A.D by Mir Muhammad Masum, a prominent figure of Mughal Period, but was completed by his son, Mir Buzurg in 1618 A.D. He was a famous scholar, poet calligraphist, historian and brace soldier.
Born at Sukkur-Bhakkar in A.H 944 Mir Masum assumed the poetical title of ‘Nami’ and was the writer of the history of Sind called after him the Tarikh-e-Masumi, which he compiled in A.H 1009 (166 A.D). impressed by his great qualities and services.
Emperor Akbar awarded him large jagirs in the surrounding area of Sukkur. In 1606 A.D he was bestowed with the title of Amin-ul-Mulk by Emperor Jahangir.
Built of burnt bricks, Mir Masum’s Minaret is about one hundred feet high and eighty-four in circumference at the base. It provides a magnificent view of the surrounding area from its top. It is surmounted by a dome to which access is provided by an internal stair-case.
An oblong stone slab bearing an inscription in Persian is laid at the entrance of the minaret which indicates the date of tits construction.
Close to the Mir Masum’s minaret here are several open stone canopies stone pillars, whose shafts are covered with Persian writings in relief and other decorative tracery. There are honey combed designs on the ceilings of the tomb. The graves of Mir Masum, his father Mir safai and his other family members are located under the canopies. The canopies bear several inscriptions in Persian and verses from the Holy Quran. The inscription on the grave of Mir Masum indicates his date of demise as A.H. 1014. (1605-6 A.D)

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